The Cover Game

(This post has been delayed due to Covid-19. I’m thrilled to finally be able to share it.)

 

 

I spent a lovely afternoon with my husband at a book store.

 

When we finally found the books there the game began.

 

The Cover Game

What can you tell from a book cover? If you know the book, what makes sense about the cover? If you don’t know the book, what do you guess the story is about?

What clues to genre does the cover give off? Is the book meant to inform or entertain more?

Do only established authors get to put their names on top of the title? Do certain fonts express credibility?

Most interesting to me was the branding of an author. How can you tell it’s from a particular person? Do an author’s books all have something in common? I want to compliment V. E. Schwab on the use of the first letter of her first name in her book covers. It struck me and I’ve since become a reader and fan.

If you’re ever again able to browse in a bookstore, here in Indiana or elsewhere, it is a fun exercise and will give you much to think about.

 

What will my covers have in common?

From now on, I will always make sure my covers convey the visual arrows I want potential readers to have. As far as cohesiveness, they will all be painted by my true love.

Virtue Chasm by Ashley Crookham cover art painting

Have you ever played the cover game? What did you learn?

 

 

 

Ashley Porkthief

You may wonder why I chose to write under the name Crookham.

Crook. Ham.

Many people assume I’m too nice to steal.

Many people assume I’m too nice to eat meat. (Especially cute pigs.)

 

 

These are the reasons I write as Ashley Crookham:

Crookham wedding photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The name Crookham comes from my grandfather. He had one sister and two daughters and therefore our branch of the Crookham tree ended when his children married and took their husbands’ names. My grandparents were and are so important to me. Although I grew up and married and took my husband’s name I knew if I ever became an author I wanted to extend the Crookham branch just a bit. It was one of the reasons I strove to finish Virtue Chasm.

 

Now you know too.

 

What role do family names play in your life?

Brewing Books

Author Ashley Crookham at Books and Brews

A post by another author caught my eye. She declared she wanted to come to Indiana just to visit our local restaurant chain. I decided it was time to make my own, postponed, trip happen.

Books & Brews” has a literary inspired menu of dishes and drinks. I met another writer there to eat (Slaughterhouse Five naan pizza, of course), admire the shelves of tomes, and ogle open cabinets of board games. It is the perfect place to bring the family, catch up with old friends, or even sneak off to plot.

Of course I mused what they would offer as “the” Gender Chasm. Perhaps a pie split into a pink strawberry side and a blueberry side with a crust divider between them?

Have you been to Books & Brews? Would you drive here to go? Have you been to other book themed restaurants?

 

 

 

Submitting to Submission

Gender Chasm is completed, thanks to Nanowrimo. I have edited it for content and sent it to beta readers for feedback on any plot confusion. When it comes back I will run it through AutoCrit again to smooth out any repetition and make better choices.

So now I sit back and relax.

Nope.

It is time for me to research potential publishers. This is my first foray into the Writer’s Market and I am fascinated. In 80 pages, I have gathered 27 initial potential publishers which I am sure will diminish upon further scrutiny.

Have you ever selected a book because you trusted the publisher? I think I might from now on. If you have a genre you enjoy, there is a certainly a book maker who specializes in it.

Here are some comments from what book publishers are seeking:

“Canadian authors only”

“Midwestern authors in a Midwestern setting”

“Hispanic literary creativity”

“LGBTQ-focused works only”

“targeting modern women”

“avoid cutesy”

“ask probing questions about the world around us”

“dark, edgy books”

“responds in 6-18 months if interested”

“include publishing history in query letter”

“a true literary marauder”

“does not consider erotica”

“as long as the romance element is strong”

“online submissions only”

“Do not fax or e-mail queries or mss”

 

I must confess, reading their desires left me wishing I had something in their niche (add a vampire, take out the sex, change my citizenship). However, I am proud of my work and will instead find a place comfortable with producing and marketing my type of novel.